Gambling? Prepare to be Shot!

I’m with Ed and Radley on this one. I read the Post story this morning, and I still am baffled as to why the cops had their guns drawn, intentionally or not. Beware, home poker players everywhere! You could be next on the vice hit list!
Update: More information from today’s Post. It’s still unknown why the gun fired “accidentally,” but the concensus of the supposed experts they interviewed seemed to be that it would be hard to unintentionally fire the gun in question, a .45 caliber. One would hope that a 17 year veteran wouldn’t be negligent enough to do this, but the facts just aren’t clear yet. As one expert said, “your finger shouldn’t be on the trigger unless you’re preparing to shoot someone.”

3 thoughts on “Gambling? Prepare to be Shot!”

  1. Here’s why they came at him with guns drawn: He’s (most likely, as per the article) a bookie who takes six figures of action per week. He’s more likely to be armed than your average citizen. Not only that, but he’s more likely to have some connection to organized crime than your average citizen (seeing as if you’re booking big action you may be paying a “fee” to OC to run your ops, or they may be bankrolling the efforts behind you to ease your variance). The nightmare scenario for the cops is they approach this guy peacefully and unarmed, he’s got big bags of cocaine in his pockets and knows that his fingerprints will match to an unsolved murder two years prior. He freaks out and starts shooting to try and get out.

    It’s implausible to be sure, but within the realm of possibility. I agree with Ed that the laws on gambling are ridiculous, but I disagree that officers shouldn’t be prepared for what could be a worst-case scenario if it were to arise. I’m totally unsurprised the cops staged the arrest the way they did.

    And I do disagree with Ed’s assertion in his comments that the guy maybe wasn’t a bookie and due to the lack of evidence of a violent nature the cops should gently pussyfoot their way into an arrest. If the guy took $28K in action from the undercover agent, I’d really like to believe the cops knew he was booking action on a bigger scale with other bettors. A newspaper reporter could be the victim of a point blank gunshot from his best friend’s handgun and he’d still write the initial article to say “the alleged gunman has been identified as Joe Smith.”

    I totally believe the guy was a bookie on a larger scale than “a few thousand a week between friends.” And I totally believe that the cops probably figured busting him could lead them up the food chain somewhere else. I’m all for agreeing that a law infringes upon my personal liberties, but if a community’s law enforcement wants to enforce the law, that’s certainly well within their scope to do so.

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  2. I meant to say…
    “A newspaper reporter could be the victim of a point blank gunshot from his best friend’s handgun and he’d still write the initial article to say “the alleged gunman has been identified as Joe Smith.” So realistically, to base an assumption that he was small-change and had no potential for violence on a newspaper report isn’t easy to do.”

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  3. My personal opinion — the cop had “secrets” he couldn’t risk coming out at interrogation time………..

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